Education in Architectural Conservation

One of the major themes of Jacqui Goddard’s career was her interest in, and commitment to, improving ways of delivering training and education in architectural conservation. It seems appropriate to ensure that one of her last contributions in the field is made more widely available.

Last year, Jacqui’s article on “Education in Architectural Conservation”, which explores the development of architectural conservation as a professional discipline during the latter half of the twentieth century, was published in the Getty Conservation Institute’s quarterly newsletter, Conservation Perspectives.

The article compiles timelines highlighting significant meetings and documents related to architectural conservation occurring between 1931-2012, as well as the major education courses and tertiary degree programs initiated in the field between 1950-1980.

Jacqui finishes her article with a discussion of some of the challenges associated with implementing professional accreditation schemes in the heritage conservation field, and notes that these schemes “exacerbate the creation of ‘silos’ and further separate conservation from the creative act of [architectural] design”.

Of greatest relevance, particularly with regard to the rising appreciation that conservation of our existing buildings is a major contribution to the sustainability of the act of building, is her concluding statement reproduced below.

Architects concerned with built environment conservation must engage with architectural education. Understanding the past is vital in addressing the future of our historic environment. If, as argued by architect and educator Ernesto Rogers, ‘conserving and constructing are moments of a single act of conscience’, then it must be part of the architectural agenda. Conservation courses need participants who already have an understanding of place, and architecture students need to understand the historic context within which they work.

The complete Fall 2020 edition (volume 35 number 2) of Conservation Perspectives, which focussed on built heritage conservation and training, is available for download here.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Vale Jacqueline Goddard

Jacqui Goddard – photograph courtesy of her LinkedIn profile

APT members who knew Jacqui Goddard, and her dedication to the highest heritage conservation ideals, are saddened to learn of her unexpected passing. She was a member and long-serving contributor to our organisation.

Jacqui contributed a great deal to education and standards in our sector. She taught in various higher education institutions over the years, including in Scotland; she contributed to professional development in New South Wales with the APT Australasia Chapter, and with other heritage organisations. She remained committed to learning and sharing throughout her valuable career and was, until recently, researching the education of architects in building conservation.

APT and the APT Australasia Chapter are poorer for her loss.

Donald Ellsmore
Convenor
APT Australasia Chapter 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Technical guide on mortars

Mortars: materials, mixes and methods, a guide to repointing mortar joints in older buildings is an essential resource for anyone wishing to repair older stone or brick masonry buildings. Written by David Young OAM, a longstanding APT member, and an acknowledged expert in the use and application of traditional mortars, this technical guide covers everything you need to know about working with lime mortars. 

Fifteen years in the making, it is wonderful to see this guide finally published through a joint effort of the Heritage Councils of all six states of Australia, and downloadable for free. Congratulations to David for his longstanding labours in compiling and writing the guide, and to all those who have supported the development and publishing of this guide.

Lime was the principal binder in mortars and plasters of Australia’s early colonial buildings, and it continued to be used in domestic construction until the mid-twentieth century. However, major changes in building practices after World War II led to the predominant use of cement in mortars. This change led to a decline in understanding of the properties of lime mortars, their important role in porous masonry, as well as the practical aspects of working with lime. This technical guide helps fill this gap. 

Part one is a primer, introducing key terms and concepts. 

Part two explores in depth the different mortar materials, mixes, binders, sands and aggregates and when they might be used, including an essential ‘Quick Guide’ to mortar mixes on pages 68–69. It also explains why the unthinking use of contemporary mortars to repair older buildings can cause long-term damage. 

Part three is the ‘how to do it’ part of the guide, covering the practical aspects of repointing – from the ‘when’ to the ‘with what’. Using the correct jointing tools and attention to the protection and curing of newly laid mortars are critical aspects of successful repairs.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Launch of technical guide on mortars

Mortars: materials, mixes and methods, a guide to repointing mortar joints in older buildings

The Heritage Council of Victoria will launch a new technical guide entitled Mortars: materials, mixes and methods, a guide to repointing mortar joints in older buildings at 12:30–1:00pm on Wednesday 10th November 2021. 

Written by David Young OAM, an acknowledged expert in the use and application of traditional mortars, and supported by the heritage councils of each state, the new technical guide is an essential resource for anyone wishing to repair older stone or brick buildings in Australia. 

Lime was the principal binder in mortars and plasters of Australia’s early colonial buildings, and it continued to be used in domestic construction until the mid-twentieth century. However, major changes in building practices after World War II led to the predominant use of cement in mortars. This change led to a decline in understanding of the properties of lime mortars, their important role in porous masonry, as well as the practical aspects of working with lime. This technical guide helps fill this gap. 

The launch will be via a Microsoft Teams webinar. Click here to register for this event.

Heritage Council of Victoria Chair Prof Philip Goad will open the launch and author David Young will showcase the guide. 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Longford Academy 2022

The Longford Academy is looking forward to once again running hands-on building conservation training courses, set in the sublime landscape of the World Heritage-listed Woolmers and Brickendon Estates in Longford, Tasmania. COVID-permitting, they are planning two courses during 2022 as follows:

Summer School in Building Conservation: 6–12 February 2022 (inclusive)

Autumn: Practical Building Conservation: 9–14 May 2022 (inclusive)

Refer to the Longford Academy flyer for more information.

For all enquiries and to express interest in these courses, please email Longford Academy.

Posted in Events | Leave a comment

Australian architectural history in the BTHL

This article by Mike Jackson gives a brief introduction to Australian architectural history captured in the BTHL.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Heritage NSW – some updates

Heritage Grants – applications close 8 Feb 2021

The 2021-23 round of NSW Heritage Grants is now open. See Heritage NSW website for more information and the funding guidelines.

Heritage Management System (HMS) – new system coming 2021

In 2021 we will launch a transformational digital system for lodging Heritage Act applications and searching heritage information. The HMS will replace existing systems and paper-based applications. See Heritage NSW website for more information and further updates as the go live date approaches.

Standard exemptions – new exemptions apply

From 1 December 2020 new standard exemptions apply for items listed on the State Heritage Register or subject to an Interim Heritage Order. If you are planning works, check if you still need to apply for approval or notify Heritage NSW of the works – they may now be covered by an exemption. See Heritage NSW website for more information about the types of exemptions that apply.

Conservation Management Plan review – changes

From July 2020 the Heritage Council of NSW ceased offering the review and endorsement of conservation management plans. We still recommend the preparation of CMPs as best practice heritage management documents and we’re currently updating guidance material to support this process. See Heritage NSW website for more information.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Longford Academy 2021 Summer School cancelled

The Longford Academy have made the following announcement.

“Uncertainty about COVID border restrictions means that we have reluctantly decided to cancel the Summer School planned for 7–13 February 2021. 

“A good proportion of the course enrolments have come in from the greater Sydney area, which currently means they would have to quarantine for 14 days on arrival in Tasmania. While the restrictions might change shortly before the course, the uncertainty makes it too difficult for our  planning. 

“As promised, we will refund any deposits and fees paid — bear with us while we do that.

“Although we had hoped that 2021 would be different from 2020, it’s looking like it’s going to be more of the same, at least for the greater part of the year. We are quite likely to find ourselves in a similar situation with our Autumn (May) course.

“Looking further ahead, we aim to run the summer school on similar dates in 2022 — pencil in 6–12 February 2022 and we’ll keep you posted. Those enrolled or who have expressed interest for this year’s course will be put on our mailing list for Summer School 2022 so you get the earliest notification of registrations opening. This should happen in early December 2021.

“Thanks for your interest in the summer school and support of the Longford Academy — we hope to see you at Woolmers & Brickendon some day soon.

If you have any questions, please contact the Longford Academy by emailing the organiser, Greg Owen.

Please note that whilst the APT Australasia Chapter supports the aims of the Longford Academy, all Longford Academy events are now run by an independent entity.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Longford Academy – 2021 Summer School in Building Conservation

The Longford Academy has announced that the 2021 Summer School in Building Conservation will be held in Longford, Tasmania between 7-13 February 2021. It will begin at 9.30am on Sun 7 February and conclude by 4.00pm Sat 13 February. Participants travelling long distances should arrive by Sat February 6.

The Summer School in Building Conservation is a seven-day intensive introduction to the conservation of traditional buildings. Held in the sublime landscape of the World Heritage listed Woolmers and Brickendon Estates in Longford Tasmania, the Summer School focuses on the use, properties, deterioration and conservation of stone, brick, mortar, plaster, wood, metals and paints. Topics covered include rising damp, salt attack, repointing of masonry, timber decay and joinery repairs, and the repair and reconstruction of corrugated iron roofs. Theory sessions will be supported by inspections on the Brickendon and Woolmers Estates.

The Summer School provides the theoretical basis for building conservation practice that is further developed in the Autumn and Spring sessions of the Longford Academy where emphasis is placed on hands-on learning.

Download more information, including the draft schedule.

To apply, download the registration form, complete and submit to the organiser.

For more information, please email the organiser, Greg Owen.

Please note that whilst the APT Australasia Chapter supports the aims of the Longford Academy, all Longford Academy events are now run by an independent entity.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Concrete Conservation

Recently, the Getty Conservation Institute published the Conservation Principles for Concrete of Cultural Significance (2020), which synthesizes current best practices in general repair of concrete and cultural conservation by providing a framework for architects, engineers, conservators, contractors, and stewards to make sound, informed decisions for conserving culturally significant concrete buildings and structures.

The publication is available in PDF format for free download.

On 2 December 2020, the GCI hosted a 90 minute virtual event bringing together a multidisciplinary group of professionals to discuss the importance of conserving historic concrete, and the importance of using a sound conservation methodology to guide practice. Access a recording of the event here.

Other relevant resources published by the GCI and mentioned during the event include:

Concrete: Case Studies in Conservation Practice

Conserving Concrete Heritage- An Annotated Bibliography

Concrete Conservation project webpage

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment